MPU6050 Interfacing with Raspberry Pi using ‘C’

Introduction:

  • MPU6050 sensor module is an integrated 6-axis Motion tracking device.
  • It has a 3-axis Gyroscope, 3-axis Accelerometer, Digital Motion Processor and a Temperature sensor, all in a single IC.
  • It can accept inputs from other sensors like 3-axis magnetometer or pressure sensor using its Auxiliary I2C bus.
  • If external 3-axis magnetometer is connected, it can provide complete 9-axis Motion Fusion output.
  • A microcontroller can communicate with this module using I2C communication protocol. Various parameters can be found by reading values from addresses of certain registers using I2C communication.
  • Gyroscope and accelerometer reading along X, Y and Z axes are available in 2’s complement form.
  • Gyroscope readings are in degrees per second (dps) unit; Accelerometer readings are in g unit.

For more information about MPU6050 Sensor Module and how to use it, refer the topic MPU6050 Sensor Module in the sensors and modules section.

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Connect Bluetooth Headset Or Speaker

In this post, I’ll share with you the final solution that lets you connect your Bluetooth headset or speaker to Raspberry Pi 3.
You’ll be able to use both output speaker and input microphone.

By the way, thanks to the people who kept me updated in the comments, it was a long journey together (:

Firstly, let me sum up the root causes of this long time problem:

  1. Drop-out of ALSA support in Bluez v5 (replaced by PulseAudio).
  2. Unavailability of correct PulseAudio version for Raspbian Jessie.
  3. Incorrect audio rooting SCO-HCI for the Bluetooth chip BCM43438.

I solved the issues 1 and 2, but I couldn’t find a good solution for 3. For issues 1 and 2, I found how to install manually PulseAudio, with code sources, or using Debian backports. For issue 3, I used a BT-USB dongle that bypassed the internal Bluetooth chip and let me use A2DP and HSP profiles.

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Setup a File Sharing Server using Samba

Samba is the Linux implementation of the SMB/CIFS file sharing standard used by Windows PCs and Apple computers, and widely supported by media streamers, games consoles and mobile apps.

This tutorial assumes that you’ll use a keyboard, mouse, and monitor to set up your file server, but you can alternatively enable SSH and connect to it remotely from another computer on your local network.

We also assume you’re using a 32GB (or smaller) micro SD card, which provides a reasonable amount of storage space without requiring any extra steps to make it accessible. However, if you need extra storage, it’s easy to mount a large external USB drive and create a Samba entry for it.

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NordVPN Auto-Connect when Raspberry Pi Boots

This is a quick tutorial on how to start an OpenVPN connection when your Raspberry Pi system boots.

Do you need a VPN for Linux?

If you’re a Linux user, you’re probably aware that Linux is one of the most secure OS out there. It has a small but dedicated user base, it exists across multiple different distributions, it limits user admin privileges, and the open-sourced code is scoured by hawk-eyed developers looking for vulnerabilities to patch up. All of that is true, but that doesn’t mean a VPN isn’t still a vital tool for Linux users.

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Adding USB Attached GPS to your Raspberry Pi Projects

This quick learning guide will show you everything you need to do to add position tracking to your Pi project using the open source GPS daemon ‘gpsd’ and an inexpensive USB to TTL adapter cable or via direct-wiring to the built-in Pi UART pins

Please note this guide installs a system service called gpsd which you can then query for data. You may be better off just using pure python to read data from the GPS, its less complex in many cases

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