Setup a File Sharing Server using Samba

Samba is the Linux implementation of the SMB/CIFS file sharing standard used by Windows PCs and Apple computers, and widely supported by media streamers, games consoles and mobile apps.

This tutorial assumes that you’ll use a keyboard, mouse, and monitor to set up your file server, but you can alternatively enable SSH and connect to it remotely from another computer on your local network.

We also assume you’re using a 32GB (or smaller) micro SD card, which provides a reasonable amount of storage space without requiring any extra steps to make it accessible. However, if you need extra storage, it’s easy to mount a large external USB drive and create a Samba entry for it.

Read More

Adding USB Attached GPS to your Raspberry Pi Projects

This quick learning guide will show you everything you need to do to add position tracking to your Pi project using the open source GPS daemon ‘gpsd’ and an inexpensive USB to TTL adapter cable or via direct-wiring to the built-in Pi UART pins

Please note this guide installs a system service called gpsd which you can then query for data. You may be better off just using pure python to read data from the GPS, its less complex in many cases

Read More

Connecting ‘Xbox Controllers’ to the Raspberry Pi

If you have ever tried to use an Xbox controller with the Raspberry Pi, you will find very quickly that they do not work correctly right out of the box. In fact to get them working you will be required to install a special driver.

With the newer Xbox One controllers that feature the Bluetooth functionality, you will also find that they will need extra work on top of the driver installation to get them to run. Namely, they are not properly supported by some of the Bluetooth functionality that is switched on by default.

This guide will show you how to get your Xbox Controllers up and running on the Raspberry Pi, while also walking you through how to get the newer Bluetooth enabled controllers to pair successfully on the Pi.Read More

Using PlayStation3 Controllers with the Raspberry Pi

If you have ever tried to utilize a PlayStation controller with the Raspberry Pi, you may have found it’s not very simple to do. The Raspberry Pi PlayStation controller guide will walk you through the process of setting up and connecting both PlayStation3 controllers and PlayStation4 controllers.

For PlayStation3 (PS3) controllers,I show you how to install the Six-pair Software and utilize it to set up your PS3 controller so it can connect to whatever Bluetooth device you are using on your Raspberry Pi.

In this PS4 controller tutorial we walk you through the process of pairing it with the Raspberry Pi’s Bluetooth and also offer alternative solutions if your controller doesn’t work with the standard Bluetooth stack. You can also set up Xbox controllers on the Raspberry Pi, as well as several other types of game controllers.

Setting up controllers is the perfect way to have your Pi ready to play some games. You might also be interested in using the controllers in other Raspberry Pi projects that make use of a gamepad.Read More

Boot Raspberry Pi from a USB Mass Storage Device

By default, the Raspberry Pi boots from a microSD card. But since the release of the Raspberry Pi 3, new Pis have been able to boot from a USB mass storage device as well. Making that happen is a pretty easy thing to do, and it’s the subject of this how-to.

A word of warning: the new boot mode is in its experimental stage, so it might not work with your USB stick or hard drive. According to the Raspberry Pi Foundation, a couple of non-working examples are the Kingston DataTraveler 100 G3 32 GB and the Verbatim PinStripe 64 GB. The USB compatibility issue will only affect some of us, but the next warning is relevant to us all: setting the boot mode is permanent. With that said, this sounds much scarier than it is: your Pi will still boot preferentially from the microSD card, if one is plugged in.Read More

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!