Boot from Usb Thumbdrive

Boot a Raspberry Pi from a USB Thumbdrive

You can boot Raspberry Pis that are older than the Pi 4 directly off of USB attached Drive. When you’re done with the process, you won’t even need to have a microSD card in the Pi’s slot.

1. Create your external boot drive. There are two main ways to do this.

  • Use Etcher to “burn” the Raspbian OS to your external drive, a process we cover in our article on how to get started with Raspberry Pi. This works great, but doesn’t copy over any data from an existing build.
Boot From Usb Thumbdrive

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Boot the Raspberry Pi from a USB Hard Drive

By default, Raspberry Pi boots up and stores all of its programs on a microSD memory card, which has rather limited bandwidth. On the Raspberry Pi 4, the memory card slot can achieve a theoretical maximum of 50 MBps, which is double the 25 MBps maximum on the Pi 3B+ (and other 3 series). you get more speed if you attach an external drive to one of the Raspberry Pi’s USB ports, especially with the Pi 4 offering USB 3.0 connections that have a theoretical maximum of 660 MBps.

Unfortunately, at this time, you can’t boot a Raspberry Pi 4 off an external drive. But you can force the Raspbian OS to use an external drive for its “root” partition, which holds all of its programs and data. So, in effect, you have a small boot partition on a microSD card but the meat of the entire operating system would still live on your speedy SSD or Flash Drive. A future firmware update will allow the Pi 4 to boot off of external drives, no microSD card required, The instructions directly below work on a current-day Pi 4 or an earlier model, but if you want to boot your Pi 3 off of an external drive scroll down to the next section of this page.Read More

Setup a File Sharing Server using Samba

Samba is the Linux implementation of the SMB/CIFS file sharing standard used by Windows PCs and Apple computers, and widely supported by media streamers, games consoles and mobile apps.

This tutorial assumes that you’ll use a keyboard, mouse, and monitor to set up your file server, but you can alternatively enable SSH and connect to it remotely from another computer on your local network.

We also assume you’re using a 32GB (or smaller) micro SD card, which provides a reasonable amount of storage space without requiring any extra steps to make it accessible. However, if you need extra storage, it’s easy to mount a large external USB drive and create a Samba entry for it.

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Adding USB Attached GPS to your Raspberry Pi Projects

This quick learning guide will show you everything you need to do to add position tracking to your Pi project using the open source GPS daemon ‘gpsd’ and an inexpensive USB to TTL adapter cable or via direct-wiring to the built-in Pi UART pins

Please note this guide installs a system service called gpsd which you can then query for data. You may be better off just using pure python to read data from the GPS, its less complex in many cases

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Connecting ‘Xbox Controllers’ to the Raspberry Pi

If you have ever tried to use an Xbox controller with the Raspberry Pi, you will find very quickly that they do not work correctly right out of the box. In fact to get them working you will be required to install a special driver.

With the newer Xbox One controllers that feature the Bluetooth functionality, you will also find that they will need extra work on top of the driver installation to get them to run. Namely, they are not properly supported by some of the Bluetooth functionality that is switched on by default.

This guide will show you how to get your Xbox Controllers up and running on the Raspberry Pi, while also walking you through how to get the newer Bluetooth enabled controllers to pair successfully on the Pi.Read More

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